Posts Tagged 'privacy'

WikiLeaks Julian Assange – 60 Minutes Interview

Julian Assange (Norway, March 2010) via Wikipedia

Julian Assange (Norway, March 2010) via Wikipedia

The 60 Minutes Interview of WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange

Publishers must be free to publish.

— Julian Assange

The overtly controversial publisher of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange is interviewed by 60 Minutes.

What are the limits of the press, of freedom of speech, and our rights to privacy?  60 Minutes presses Assange in this exclusive interview over the fine line of what is journalism vs. espionage.

The Wikilieaks model is different.
It prefers to take raw data, make it available
and let others decide the meaning…
It beats close to the heart of the internet
and the younger generation…

— 60 Minutes, CBS News

Watch the full interview here, WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange, Pt. 1.

HT @TheNextWeb
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Privacy on Fast Track Back to User Control

Google and Mozilla announce browser privacy tools

Congress should require all advertising and tracking companies
to offer consumers the choice of whether they want to be
followed online to receive tailored ads, and make that option
easily chosen on every browser.

— The New York Times

In response to the FTC December privacy report which endorsed support for a national ‘Do Not Track’ policy, Mozilla and Google recently moved to put privacy controls back in the hands of users.

‘Do Not Track’ is a first step in putting users in control of the way their information is collected and used online.

Both browser makers, Mozilla and Google, recently took independent initiatives in advance of a national policy.

Mozilla, the Open Source web developers and makers of the popular Firefox web browser says it is seeking ways to give users better insight and control into the ways their personal information is collected, used, stored and shared. They recently announced the coming release of a ‘Do Not Track’ feature for the Firefox web browser.

Chrome, the web browser of the eponymous parent company Google, released a browser extension that offers a “one-step, persistent opt-out of personalized advertising and related data tracking.”

Get the Google Chrome web browser.  Or try Mozilla’s Firefox web browser.

5 Things Facebook Can Do To Improve Facebook Places for Users

Picture of notebook screen with Facebook and F...

Image via Wikipedia

Facebook Places:  Mobile Location Identification

The mobile app Facebook Places recently launched with quite a storm over its lack of privacy setting for Facebook users.

To better help users Facebook created a video (see below) on how to use Places and control user settings for greater privacy.

The key to moving forward as internet services advance
is to assure account security and information privacy
as framed within a quality experience.

Places offers a unique way to geotag yourself and other Facebook users by “checking in” to locations like cafes, parks, clubs, schools, and stores much like Foursquare or Gowalla. Yet, Facebook can still improve Places and its website for users to make Places more accessible and easier to use and trust for users and parents.

5 Things Facebook Can Do To Improve Places

Here are five things Facebook could do to give greater user control and assuredness of privacy, while offering quality experience in Places.

  1. Set the User Default Settings to “Private” or “Only Me”
    By setting the Facebook Places default setting to “Friends”
    Facebook exposes all users to being tagged or identified
    in any locations if a friend tags them, whether they are in
    that location or not.
  2. Add Security Feature to block Work, Education
    and Other Categories

    Just like selective privacy settings using in Photos and Videos
    or for your Wall, Facebook could add User Folders to Places
    privacy settings block groups of selected “friends,” Facebook
    could add a feature in Privacy Settings.
  3. Add Places icon on Home Page Apps Column
    to Enable “Friend Discovery.”

    This would add a conspicuous monitoring page of friend’s
    who allow their locations to be discovered. Also a great to have
    for conferences, when travelling in a group or family and at
    large venues or public events.
  4. Add Places link on
    Upper Menu Bar > Account Setting > Privacy page

    This would give Places its own Category row for greater visibility
    and easier access to user  Places privacy controls.
  5. Disable Status Tagging feature
    without select user approval
    .
    Facebook should give users the default controls to choose if
    and by whom they want to be tagged and identified at
    a location when someone else tags them.

What would you suggest Facebook do? Share your ideas here.

Facebook is an innovation leader in the social web. With services like Facebook Places, Gowalla, Google Places, and Foursquare we will eventually be able to extend our personal reach and business communications with geo-targeted ads, real-time updates, customer feedback, group offers, auto-reservation services and check ins, and more.

The key to moving forward as internet services advance is assuring account security and information privacy as framed within a quality experience.

Read Facebook’s blog here.  Or leave a Comment here.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Facebook Blows It Again

An open letter.
Facebook blew it again. There is no disputing it.
Many, perhaps millions are upset, even distrustful of Facebook. The launch of Facebook Places put users privacy at risk. This again exhibits a repetitive practice of a seemingly careless company whose computer servers hold and serve out users personal information and identifying their locations to 3rd parties, advertisers and now potentially everyone.
Should Facebook users expect Facebook to change its behavior? Probably not. Should they expect another privacy policy change? *Sigh* To what end, even I would ask?
Users have received a privacy policy change in March of this year, 2010. And, oops, Facebook does it again with Places.
The time for a Federal Policy on computer privacy rights is now. Perhaps, in this particular instance for the federal government to step in and investigate the apparent lack of respect and blatant disregard for its citizen’s Constitutional rights to privacy. It is time for a national discussion that debates the online practices of Facebook and all other companies that use electronic communications and or computer servers to transmit, collect, store, access, manage, provide 3rd party access to, or resell the private citizen’s personal information and or data.
This is at least the fourth betrayal of privacy by Facebook of its users’ information in the past 4 years. What has to occur for there to be greater oversight or punitive measures put in place to deter a company from such practices?
This is not a post to berate Facebook.  The online social networking platform has provided both positive technological and social innovation and progress of historic proportion. Facebook ecosystem provides a previously unimaginable ability to reconnect, maintain, follow and grow relationships with past and current friends and consumers, with increasing business marketing and sales potentials.
However, Facebook users and even business and government, must press for greater accountability to protect citizens, netizens, the online users in the wake of Facebook’s latest privacy misstep. We must call on Facebook and other online companies to maintain users’ and businesses privacy rights as default privacy policy, and not as an elective check box that must be discovered to be unchecked.
Related posts

How to Set Your Privacy Settings for Facebook Places: 14 Things To Do

How to Set Your Privacy Settings for Facebook Places: 14 Steps Things to Do Facebook Places logo

Another Facebook User Privacy Blunder?

Facebook Places app was released this week without assuring adequate user rights of privacy in setting the default app settings to OFF. This would have enabled users to learn the full extents of the Places app before they chose to use it and potentially expose themselves or others locations. As a result, Facebook unleashed a firestorm of discomfort and even causing the ACLU to step in.

What is Facebook Places and How Can I Use It Securely?

Facebook Places is the location sharing “check in” service that allows you to share your location with friends or everyone or no one if you choose. Places enables Facebook users to check in to a location to make themselves discoverable to their friends or to everyone in Facebook.

Using Places is a way to find friends or to discover new people who have the same interest in the place you both are in when you “check in” using the Facebook Places app.

Places is currently available only in the United States.

Tagging and Control in Places

Places enables you to tag your friends or anyone else at a common location who has their Places settings set wide open to “Everyone.” This will notify your Facebook network and their network just like tagging them in a Photo or a Note.

Places Privacy and Discovery

According to Facebook, only your friends can see when you visit or are tagged at a place. However, if you have your Privacy Settings (http://www.facebook.com/settings/?tab=privacy) set to “Everyone,” then anyone can discover your location.

Why? Setting to “Everyone” opens up your profile information to the entire Facebook network.

Tip: See Privacy for Places > Will my friends applications be able to
access to my location information?  http://www.facebook.com/help/?page=1080

14 Steps to Secure Your Facebook Places Privacy Settings

Not everyone wants nor chooses to be found or tagged by friends. It would have been good if Facebook had released the Places app with a default setting as non-Discoverable. but they did not.

If you want more control over your Privacy and Tagging you just need to change your settings.

Disabling Places Tagging

Facebook Places does offer user location privacy with tagging control for those who choose not to participate in Places Tagging.

Facebook-Places-Privacy-1

Turning off Places tagging will disable the ability for friends to check you in at any location, follow these steps:

Go to Privacy Settings

1. Select Account Settings. (upper right of the Facebook window under the Account Settings tab)

2. Change your Privacy Settings.

Tip: If logged into Facebook, just click or copy and paste this link:
http://www.facebook.com/settings/?tab=privacy

3. Selecting Privacy settings will open the Choose Your Privacy Settings page.

4. Look for the Things I share section.

Facebook-Places-Privacy-2

5.  Find and Choose your Security Settings for “Places I check in to.”

6.  Select your desired Level of Security to whom you want to make yourself discoverable if you choose to use Places to check in to a location.

a) “Everyone” broadcasts your location to everyone on the Facebook network, that’s 500 Million possible people.
b) “Friends of Friends” broadcasts your information to your friends and their friends networks.
c) “Friends Only” only broadcast your location to your immediate friend network.
d) Choosing “Custom” enables you to selectively choose who you want, or no one at all.

7.  Selecting Custom give you the most restrictive options.

Facebook-Places-Privacy-4

8. Custom Privacy enables you to make yourself visible no one at all by selecting Only Me. You can also set it to a select group or a few chosen friends.

How To Do It?
Privacy Settings > Customize setting > Things I share > Places I check in to > Customize > Select Make this visible to > [Select] ONLY ME

Facebook-Places-Privacy-5

Control How Others Discover or Tag You in Places

9. Next, go to Include me in “People Here Now” after I check in to control others ability to tag you.

10. You can uncheck “Include me in “People Here Now” after I check in” to disable others from discovering your location. (see below image) Leaving “Enabled” checked will make you visible to friends and any other people on Facebook checked in nearby.

Facebook-Places-Privacy-6

Secure Control Settings to Let Friends Check You In

11. You can Control settings to “Let Friends Check Me In.”
This will disable your location from being tagged to a place should a friend choose to tag you.

12. Go to the Things others share section and

13. Go to Friends can check me into Places options

14. Select your desired Level of Security

a) Enabled: allows others to check you in, and tag you.
b) Disable: prevents others from checking you in, or tagging you

Facebook-Places-Privacy-7

Location Check-in and People Discovery with “People Here Now”

Since Facebook Places is a mobile app, in the “People Here Now” section, you can see others who are checked in with you at that place. This section is visible for a limited amount of time and only to people who are checked in there. That way you can meet other people who might share your interests.

Making Your Location Private after Checking-in

If you prefer not to appear in the People Here Now” section, uncheck the “Include me in ‘People Here Now’ after I check in” privacy control.

How to Secure Your Mobile Settings

Check out this great slide show on Mashable for mobile users.

Learn More About Your Privacy on Facebook

Facebook Help: Facebook places
http://www.facebook.com/help/?page=1080

Facebook Blog; Places Launches
http://blog.facebook.com/blog.php?post=418175202130

ACLU: Facebook Privacy Resources Page
http://dotrights.org/facebook-places-your-friends-are-here-what-about-your-privacy

Related posts

Facebook Like button Turns Web Pages into Two-Way Communication Channels

Message to Facebook:

Just because I “Like” a web page, post or video
doesn’t mean I want nor give my permission
to be contacted “back” by that post’s publisher.

After its recent update, users will find that clicking the Facebook Like button on any web page now enables publishers to publish back content to the feeds of all people who liked a specific page.

This turns all webpages on the internet with a Like button into a two-way communication channel.

The Good.

Well, this now allows publishers to directly publish replies as News Feed content in “all” users who clicked their Like button on their object: blog post, video, picture, link etc.

The Bad.

Spam. Here’s the scenario. You like a post or video on any website that you want to share on your Facebook News Feed or Wall.. Suddenly you get contacted back by the Publisher of the post about, how you can buy this or come to the show, etc. This is spam.

This FB update may be seen as a good step in enabling greater communication on the web, but IMHO, I find it a bit intrusive.

Bug Fix

One solution would be adding an option in the Like button for “Ok to Reply via Like button.”

See the full post on All Facebook here.

Related articles

The Gizmodo iPhone Fiasco: Infographic

Gizmodo iPhone Saga: Infographic via FastCompanyGizmodo iPhone Saga: Infographic via FastCompany

In case you were wondering how it all began
and how it was to turn out.

Read the post here.


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